News: Playlists

Issue 59’s Spotify Playlist!

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Nine of our writers in Issue 59 contributed to our issue playlist. Their songs, stories, and the reasons they chose the tune follow. Listen below or on SmokeLong’s Spotify Channel!

 

The List

“Reynardine” by Anne Briggs – Maia Jenkins, “History

This Victorian English ballad has appeared in countless guises, but Anne Briggs’ a capella version matches the bare-bones dread I hope is evoked in “History.” The gruesome contrast between Briggs’ angelic soprano with the lyrics,”She followed him, his teeth so bright did shine. And he led her over the mountain, did the sly bold Reynardine,” is something I was trying to get at as I was writing. Really, the story–an enticing creature leads a young girl away to an ambiguously horrible fate–is the same as mine, and so many others, sadly.

“Caribbean Blue” by Enya – Tochukwu Emmanuel Okafor, “Watch, Watching

Enya’s songs help me meditate, fill me with so much joy and inner peace. I listened mostly to Caribbean Blue while writing “Watch, Watching.” The main character of the story loved the song on repeat, and I could happily live with that for the period that I worked on his story. Enya’s music (alone) inspires my art.

“No Witness” by LP – Daniel Myers, “Body Snatcher

I don’t really know if the lyrics connect with my story at all, but I listened to this song a lot while I was working on this story. The pace of the song constantly shifts, and I think this influenced my story’s tone.

“The Neighbors” by Jonathan Richman & the Modern Lovers – Amber Sparks, “The Noises from the Neighbors Upstairs: A Nightly Log

So perfectly apartment living.

“A Long Time Ago” by First Aid Kit – Dana Heifetz, “Drowned

I selected this song for a very simple reason–my netmaker said that she loves it; if she weren’t who she is, she even might have sung it to her beloved drowned.

“Pilgrim” by Balmorhea – Zach Yontz, “Winter Light

This song reminds me of flat, quiet Midwestern nights and the silence of two people together in a car.

“This Must Be the Place (Naive Melody)” by Talking Heads – Lori Sambol Brody, “The Sky is Just Another Neighborhood

The song starts with a one minute musical sequence that sounds equally innocent and uneasy; then David Byrne sings of longing, resignation, love, and hope, a rumination on what is “home.”  This theme and emotions reflect how I feel when I reread “The Sky Is Just Another Neighborhood.”

“Eat Your Heart Up” by The Blow – Emily Jane Young, “Parasomnia

Maybe a little too on the nose? In choosing a song, I thought first of The Blow, because so many of their songs offer a unique take on heartbreak, and there is often a heavy beat, which you’d want for a song with a heart as the main character. I listened to this album a lot in college, and while I didn’t specifically have it in mind when I wrote “Parasomnia,” this song must have been at least a subconscious seed for the story, as it includes both images of wanting to eat “your” heart and also a heart walking around in the world.

“Prélude à l’après-midi d’un faune” (“Prelude to the Afternoon of a Faun”) by Claude Debussy – Sumita Mukherji, “Lifeline

This tone poem from Debussy is a musical evocation of the poem “Afternoon of a Faun,” in which a half-man, half-goat creature delights in memories of forest nymphs. I love it for its impressionistic nature, as I thought of my piece in a series of images, beginning with the ending image.

Our Issue 58 Playlist Is Here

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story art

We’ve got an amazing issue for you this time–and a Spotify playlist to go along with it. After you’ve read the stories (or while you’re reading them!) check out the playlist hand-picked by our authors of songs that accompany their stories. (Note: Not all authors participated, so only select stories in the issue are represented by the playlist.)

Enjoy!

Issue 58 Playlist Selections

Listen along here: open.spotify.com/user/smokelongquarterly/playlist/6N245OExhaXIMYSFZWpne0

“Shout” by Tears for Fears

(Caitlin Pryor, “Epistle from the Hospital of Strong Opinions” )

In my SLQ interview, Karen Craigo asked me what I would “shout in the courtyard,” as my character does, and the first thing that came to mind was Tears for Fears’ 1985 mega-hit, “Shout.” Tears for Fears co-founder Roland Orzabal has said that the song was not only a response to the writings of Arthur Janov, creator of primal scream theory (a popular 1970s psychotherapeutic approach that attempted to resolve trauma through catharsis or, in some cases, actual screaming) but also a Cold War-era incitement to protest politically and “Let it all out.”

“Gnossienne No. 1” by Erik Satie

(Charlotte Pattinson, “Brussels, 2004”)

Because I mention a piece of music in my story, I think it probably makes sense to have that be the song to accompany the story.

“Bad News from Home” by Randy Newman

(Geoff Kronik, “The Jumper”)

I think the song’s 1st-person singer and my story’s protagonist would relate to each other.

“All Kinds of Time” by Fountains of Wayne

(Jeff Ewing, “Parliament of Owls”)

I’ve always liked the multiple ways the football cliche “all kinds of time” can be read, and the suspension of time the song itself achieves. The moment captured is a glory days moment that automatically implies an unconstructive nostalgia. Tim’s disillusioned epiphany is hidden in there somewhere.

“You Are Never Alone” by Vic Chestnutt

(Steve Edwards, “Starlings”)

There’s a brokenness and humor and hope in Vic Chesnutt. What I love about this song in relation to “Starlings” is the litany of things—like taking pain meds or having an abortion—that are all, well, okay. You can keep on keeping on because you’re never alone. I imagine that’s part of what the narrator of my story is realizing about wanting to hang himself.

“The Evening Descends” by Evangelicals

(Pete Segall, “I Thought I Knew the Answer for a Minute”)

Here’s a track that’s barely three minutes long and feels like three or four different songs. Each one seems like it should be goofy, lite punk – but every time it’s on the verge of tipping into frivolity…  it just doesn’t.

“I’ll Fly Away” by Gillian Welch & Alison Krauss

 (Lee Reilly, “Pastor Bob’s Picnic”)

“Teenage Dreams” by Moniker

(Jeremy Packert Burke, “Miller Time”)

At the heart of my story is this desire to grow up faster, to skip the pain of teenage years and revel in adulthood before that innocence is lost. In Moniker’s song, there are some wonderful reflections on the pain of this, the interplay between having too much fun to worry much and worrying too much to have much fun; a lot of the same concern of my story is caught in the lines ‘These days I think I know who I am/I wish I knew who I was going to be’

“Saltbreakers” by Laura Veirs

(Josh Jones, “The Cartographers”)

I love its oceanic imagery and upbeat, celebratory tone that complements the sense of mystery and hope in my piece.

“An Ending, A Beginning” by Dustin O’Halloran

(Cheryl Pappas, “Nature.”)

Besides the aptness of the title, this song seemed perfect to me because it’s plaintive and simple, which captures the essence of my story.

“For the Widows in Paradise, For the Fatherless in Ypsilanti” by Sufjan Stevens

(Carolyn Nims, New Yorker Story About Michigan”)

This was an obvious choice. But also, its loveliness undercuts the story’s darkness, and its rawness echoes some of the more ragged emotions in the story.

“That’s the Spirit” by Judee Sill

(Julian K. Jarboe, “The Heavy Things”)

“How We Quit the Forest” by Rasputina

(Tessa Yang, “Princess Shipwreck”)

To me this song sounds like a spooky fable. It’s about choosing to turn away from the familiar, because the familiar isn’t actually what it seems.

“Hard Times (No One Knows Better Than I)” by Ray Charles

(Jonathan Nixon, “Our Father”)

In my story, a Ray Charles record can be heard playing throughout the house. I feel the song “Hard Times” not only fits the mood of the piece, but also takes on the role of the father’s voice.

“The Last of the Famous International Playboys” by Morrissey

(John Meyers, “1922 Roma Airship Disaster Tattoo”)

I was listening to Bona Drag quite a bit when I wrote the story and imagined that the hero would likely have been a big fan of this song.  I’ll leave it to readers to interpret the connection.

“Night Ferry” by Anna Cline

(Allison Pinkerton, “Zelberg”)

Anna Clyne’s orchestral composition “Night Ferry” (2012) pairs well with my story “Zelberg,” which focuses on a cellist who has sprinkled his wife’s ashes all over the orchestra pit. When I listened to “Night Ferry,” I got an ominous feeling, and the strings sounded like swarming bees. “Zelberg” is told in the first-person plural. The collective voice details the orchestra’s attempts to protect Zelberg from the police, who’ve been summoned after an audience member notices the ashes and mistakenly assumes Zelberg’s a terrorist.